All posts tagged: fishermen

Joy of sunrise

“Plenty of people miss their share of happiness not because they never found it but because they didn’t stop to enjoy it.” – William Faulkner

Nature’s masterpiece

“Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson

New day for you

“Each day is an adventure in discovering the meaning of life. It is each little thing that you do that day – whether it be spending time with your friends, running in a cross-country meet or just simply staring at the crashing ocean- that holds the key to discovering the meaning of life. I would rather be out enjoying these things than pondering them. We may never really discover the meaning of life, but the knowledge we gain in our quest to discover it is truly more valuable.” ~Jack Canfield, Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul II

Never stop yourself from living

“Life is painful and messed up. It gets complicated at the worst of times, and sometimes you have no idea where to go or what to do. Lots of times people just let themselves get lost, dropping into a wide open, huge abyss. But that’s why we have to keep trying. We have to push through all that hurts us, work past all our memories that are haunting us. Sometimes the things that hurt us are the things that make us strongest. A life without experience, in my opinion, is no life at all. And that’s why I tell everyone that, even when it hurts, never stop yourself from living.” ― Alysha Speer Learning from another woman’s survival, and getting inspired with her story of pain and determination. My prayers are with you.  Soar high, Robyn Lee. Fishermen captured at sunrise in Whitesand Beach, San Ignacio, Manay, Davao Oriental  © Jojie Alcantara

Coming home

“The ache for home lives in all of us, the safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.” ~ Maya Angelou Though I love this image in its vivid sunrise colors, I wanted to see its impact in black and white this time.  I like the outcome because the absence of color made the scene even more dramatic.

Waiting for early catch © Jojie Alcantara

Waiting for the catch

“Successful people are always looking for opportunities to help others. Unsuccessful people are always asking, “What’s in it for me?” ― Brian Tracy Typical early morning scene in the coastal village of Dahican in Mati, Davao Oriental Locals wait for the boats to come back and help fishermen unload their catch, and being rewarded by an early meal. © Jojie Alcantara

Morning fishers

Dahican at Daybreak (Mati, Davao Oriental) Jojie Alcantara, May 2012 Dahican, the popular and most beautiful beach in my birthplace Mati, is an extended strip of stunning white beach lined with coconut trees, facing sparkling turquoise waters that ebb and flow wildly into the Pacific, inviting adventurous skimboarders to surf in glee. But there is more to Mati than sand and sea, and glorious island hopping. When I am in Mati, I always arrange for my early (4am) sunrise shoot, to capture early risers, and fishermen returning from their catch, while locals run to assist with the boat.  Here, they are able to get free meals from the fisherman. Visited my gallery about my birthplace * * * *

You were not born to fail

Welcome every morning with a smile. Look on the new day as another special gift from your Creator, another golden opportunity to complete what you were unable to finish yesterday. Be a self-starter. Let your first hour set the theme of success and positive action that is certain to echo through your entire day. Today will never happen again. Don’t waste it with a false start or no start at all. You were not born to fail.” ~ Og Mandino View large image here

Fish be with you

Taken early Christmas dawn in General Santos City, when fishermen caught this 74-kilo Moonfish, or Opah, a very expensive delicacy in countries like Hawaii. In the Philippines, it is called “Diana”. I was told by the fishermen that it was a lucky day for me because it’s not often (every 15 days or so only) that they have caught two “Dianas” in one day. Opah or moonfish (Lampris regius) is one of the most colorful of the commercial fish species available in Hawaii. A silvery-grey upper body color shades to a rose red dotted with white spots toward the belly. Its fins are crimson, and its large eyes are encircled with gold. The moonfish’s large, round profile may be the origin of its name. Moonfish landed in Hawaii range from 60 to over 200 pounds in round weight. A pelagic wandering species, it is often found in the company of tunas and billfish. In Hawaii, the Opah was viewed as a good luck fish by old-time longline fishermen, who would give it away as a …

Sea Seek

“We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea, whether it is to sail or to watch – we are going back from whence we came.” ~ John F. Kennedy Boracay Helicopter Tours, Philippines (2010) Photography, Jojie Alcantara Update: This image made it to the cover of Silkair, the inflight magazine of Silkwinds (Regional Wing of Singapore Airlines) this month of April 2014! Click for details